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News (PC World Magazine Latest News)

  • The goal of HP's radical The Machine: Reshaping computing around memory


    Not every computer owner would be as pleased as Andrew Wheeler that their new machine could run "all weekend" without crashing.

    But not everyone's machine is "The Machine," an attempt to redefine a relationship between memory and processor that has held since the earliest days of parallel computing.

    Wheeler is a vice president and deputy labs director at Hewlett Packard Enterprise. He's at the Cebit trade show in Hanover, Germany, to tell people about The Machine, a key part of which is on display in HPE's booth.

    Rather than have processors, surrounded by tiered RAM, flash and disks, communicating with one another to identify which of their neighbors has the freshest copy of the information they need, HPE's goal with The Machine is to build a large pool of persistent memory that application processors can just access.

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  • Apple acquires Workflow automation app, offers it free


    Apple has acquired the Workflow automation app, which allows iOS users to trigger a sequence of tasks across apps with a single tap.

    A spokesman for Apple confirmed on Wednesday the company’s acquisition of DeskConnect, the developer of the app, and the Workflow app, but did not provide further details.

    Workflow, developed for the iPhone, iPad, and Apple Watch, allows users to drag and drop combinations of actions to create workflows that interact with the apps and content on the device. It won an Apple design award in 2015 at its annual Worldwide Developers Conference.

    Some of the examples of tasks for which Workflow can be used are making animated GIFs, adding a home screen icon to call a loved one and tweeting a song the user has been listening to, according to a description of the app.

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  • Look before you leap: 4 hard truths about IoT


    Most technologies go through a stage when everything seems possible. Personal computers in the early 1980s, the internet in the late 1990s and mobile apps around the beginning of this decade were like that.

    But so was the first unboxing of a Galaxy Note 7. In time, either suddenly or gradually, reality sets in.

    The internet of things still looks promising, with vendors and analysts forecasting billions of connected devices that will solve all sorts of problems in homes and enterprises. But the seams are starting to show on this one, too. As promising as the technology is, it has some shortcomings. Here are a few.

    BAD DATA

    IoT systems are only as good as the data they capture, and some of it is not great.

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  • It wasn't the money: Wozniak on robots, design, and Apple's origins


    More than 40 years after founding Apple Computer, Steve Wozniak has a lot to say about the early days of the world’s richest company—and about technology, learning, and being a born engineer.

    On stage at the IEEE TechIgnite conference in Burlingame, California, on Wednesday, he gave a glimpse into how a tech legend thinks.

    On open source

    In the early 1970s, Wozniak read about phone phreaking, in which “phreakers” made free phone calls by using electronics to mimic the tones used for dialing each number. To learn how to do it, he went to the only place he knew that had books and magazines about computers: The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. He went on a Sunday and walked right in. “The smartest people in the world don’t lock doors,” Wozniak said.

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  • How to prep your phone for offline use


    The internet isn’t quite everywhere yet, so here’s what you need to do to survive your next commute, flight, camping trip, or whenever you want to disconnect.